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Start Talking!
Know! April is Alcohol Awareness Month
4/12/2017

The media has done a good job bringing to light the prevalence and severity of the use of heroin, prescription drugs and marijuana among our nation’s youth. But what about alcohol? We don’t hear much about it in the news anymore. Is underage drinking still that widespread? And is it really that big of a deal? YES and YES.

Alcohol remains the number one drug of choice among youth, and excessive drinking continues to lead to more than 4,300 adolescent deaths each year. The good news is that, overall, underage drinking has declined. The 2016 Monitoring the Future Survey found that 7 percent of 8th grade students, 20 percent of 10th grade students and 33 percent of 12th grade students had consumed alcohol within the past 30 days – all down from past years.

Similarly, when it comes to binge drinking (defined as five or more drinks in a row by males or four or more drinks in a row by females), it has also decreased, with 3 percent of 8th grade students, 10 percent of 10th grade students and 16 percent of 12th grade students reporting recent binge drinking. However, anytime young people are drinking alcohol, it is a problem. Furthermore, the 2015 Youth Risk Behavior Survey showed that 8 percent of high school students admitted to getting behind the wheel after drinking and 20 percent said they rode in a car with a driver who had been drinking.

Car accidents are the leading cause of death for adolescents. And stepping into a car as either an impaired driver or as the passenger of an impaired driver can be a fatal mistake. The hazards of underage drinking include a long list of risks and should never be taken lightly.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, youth who drink alcohol are more likely to experience:

School problems – missing school and poor or failing grades
Social problems – fighting and loss of interest in extracurricular activities
Legal problems – from impaired driving or physically hurting someone while under the influence
Physical problems – hangovers and illnesses
Disruption of normal growth and sexual development
Changes in brain development - some that may have lifelong effects, including memory issues
Unwanted, unplanned and unprotected sexual activity
Abuse of other drugs
Physical and sexual assault
Increased risk for suicide and homicide
Unintentional alcohol-related injuries and fatalities – due to burns, falls, drowning and alcohol poisoning (in addition to car crashes)

There are also certain times and circumstances in our children’s lives where they may be at a greater likelihood for underage drinking. When youth transition into middle school or high school, or acquire a driver’s license - these are especially risky times for teen alcohol use. Youth with conduct problems, depression or other emotional issues; anyone with a family history of alcoholism; young people whose friends drink or are involved in other deviant activities – are all at increased risk for the onset of teen drinking.

It is also important to keep in mind that young people who begin drinking before the age of 15 are six times more likely to develop alcoholism or have problems with alcohol later in life, compared to those who wait until turning 21. With this in mind, the importance of delaying drinking is immense. In a future tip, we will share some ideas to assist you in keeping your child alcohol-free.

Learn how to get the drug prevention conversation started at StartTalking.Ohio.Gov.


 
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